Sunscreen is essential but buying sunscreen can be very confusing. From water resistant sunscreens to SPF to broad spectrum protection, it is hard to know what you need to keep your skin safe this summer. Sunscreens protect you from the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) radiation from reaching your skin. There are two types of ultraviolet radiation, UVA and UVB. They both damage your skin and increase your risk of skin cancer.

The difference between UVA and UVB

Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is part of the electromagnetic (light) spectrum that reaches the earth from the sun. Ultraviolet A (UVA) is the longer wave UV ray that causes lasting skin damage, skin aging, and can cause skin cancer. Ultraviolet B (UVB) is the shorter wave UV ray that causes sunburns, skin damage, and can cause skin cancer.

The definition of SPF

SPF stands for Sun Protection Factor. The SPF number on sunscreen is a measure of a sunscreen’s ability to prevent UVB from damaging the skin. The number of the SPF is how long it will take the sun to redden the skin. For example, SPF 15 sunscreen theoretically prevents reddening 15 times longer than no sunscreen at all– about five hours.

What is broad spectrum?

Sunscreens that have broad-spectrum protect the skin from both UVA and UVB rays. Beginning in December 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will implement new rules for “broad-spectrum” products.

New sunscreen rules

Here are some of the new rules The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued for labels on sunscreen.

• Sunscreens may be labeled “broad- spectrum” if they provide protection against both UVA and UVB radiation according to FDA-sanctioned test methods.

• Only broad-spectrum sunscreens with an SPF of 15 or higher may state that they protect against skin cancer if used as directed with other sun protection measures.

• Broad-spectrum sunscreens with SPFs of 2-14 must display a warning that the product has not been shown to help prevent skin cancer or early skin aging.

• The terms “sunblock,” “sweatproof” and “waterproof” are no longer allowed on sunscreen labels.

• Sunscreens may claim to be “water-resistant,” but must specify whether they protect the skin for 40 or 80 minutes of swimming or sweating, based on standard testing. Sunscreens that are not water-resistant must instruct consumers to use a water-resistant sunscreen if swimming or sweating.

• A company cannot claim that its sunscreen products provide sun protection for more than two hours without submitting test results to prove this.


 

 

 

Tagged with:
 

What a convenience! Close to the commuter rail, close to commuter routes! A rare 3 bedroom condo in North Salem! This recently converted condo has plenty of parking, shining hardwood floors, brand new windows and top-of-the-line appliances. Enjoy the premium ceiling fans throughout for those warm summer nights. The hard wood floors shine, the granite counter tops compliment the quality kitchen cabinets and the stainless steel appliances are only 3 years young. The BAXI combined gas heat system and water heater keeps your monthly bills low. You’ll love the high ceilings, you’ll appreciate the spacious rooms. 1 and 1/2 bathrooms ensures convenience in the morning. Close to the train; easy access to down town Salem. Make an appointment to see this property today.

This is a Garden style home and features 6 total rooms, 1 full bath, 1 half bath, 3 bedrooms, 0.14 Acres, and is currently available for $255,000.

For complete details click here.

Tagged with:
 

One of the most expensive things in your grocery cart could be your laundry detergent but what if you could make a natural and less expensive alternative? You can easily and inexpensively make your own homemade powdered laundry soap.

Here is how:

Ingredients:

1 Bar Fels Naptha Soap – grated

1 Bar Ivory Soap – grated

3 cups Washing Soda

3 cups Borax

1. Combine all ingredients.

2. Use 1 to 2 tablespoons per load.

This batch of laundry soap will lasts a long time and also does a great job of deodorizing.

Are you looking for a deal when buying your next home? Buying a fixer-upper home just might be the way to go but there are some important things to know before you buy. These helpful hints can help you save time, money and a lot of headaches when buying a fixer-upper.

Set a budget: You need to know how much money you can afford to spend. You will want to factor in the price of the property plus the cost of the renovations. Remember to plan for the unknown, add at least 10% to it for “overruns”. Most projects never seem to go as planned.

Plan ahead: Buying a fixer-upper requires more planning. When looking at potential homes you will want to make a list of renovations. Try to come up with an estimated cost of the renovations. You will also want to identify whether or not you have the expertise to do the renovations or if you will need to hire a contractor.

Get a home inspection: There are some things that are unseen to the untrained eye. A good home inspection will be able to tell you all of the needed repairs and potential pitfalls.

Remember buying a fixer-upper is an investment. Follow the tips on this list and you will be prepared for the project of buying, renovating and owning a fixer-upper.

Set your Twitter account name in your settings to use the TwitterBar Section.